Wednesday, December 10, 2014

ECWCA Presentation Ideas

What could we potentially do for an ECWCA presentation session? Here's what you need to consider about presentation sessions: Presenters will address a specific issue or topic in writing center work as a group or from multiple perspectives. These sessions typically feature 3 speakers and include 15 minutes for questions and discussion.

Potential Categories for Topics:
  • Ethical considerations for tutoring students working on high-stakes documents (e.g. application essays for college, graduate school, fellowships, or jobs)
  • Ethical considerations of long-term tutoring relationships
  • Definitions of ethics in the workplace, the academy, and the field
  • Ethical considerations for community engagement
  • Approaches for tutoring papers on controversial topics
  • Foundationalist and antifoundationalist conceptions of ethics
  • Negotiating identity in the writing center
  • Structures of leadership and authority in the writing center
  • Teaching ethics to beginning tutors
  • Ethics in writing center publications
  • The ethics of researching writing centers, tutors, and students

ECWCA Poster Session Ideas

What could we potentially do for an ECWCA poster session? Here's what you need to consider about poster sessions: Posters present research results or works-in-progress in a visual display and will be featured in an exhibition in the main conference hall. Presenters will have an opportunity to interact with attendees and answer questions during a designated poster presentation session.

Potential Categories for Topics:

  • Ethical considerations for tutoring students working on high-stakes documents (e.g. application essays for college, graduate school, fellowships, or jobs)
  • Ethical considerations of long-term tutoring relationships
  • Definitions of ethics in the workplace, the academy, and the field
  • Ethical considerations for community engagement
  • Approaches for tutoring papers on controversial topics
  • Foundationalist and antifoundationalist conceptions of ethics
  • Negotiating identity in the writing center
  • Structures of leadership and authority in the writing center
  • Teaching ethics to beginning tutors
  • Ethics in writing center publications
  • The ethics of researching writing centers, tutors, and students

Monday, November 17, 2014

AR5: "Learning Disabilities and the Writing Center"

In light of our goal to serve and assist students, it is important to rely on skills that help us do so. However, assisting those with learning disabilities means that we need to understand the challenges and obstacles those students face when writing. Discuss how roles change and how the writing space must be navigated when serving learning-disabled students, while exploring the implications of the article; be sure to connect to your own experience. Include quotes and detailed descriptions.

Remember to include the following in your COMPLETE PARAGRAPH RESPONSE:

  • Your impressions of the article (likes/dislikes/agree/disagree)
  • How does it connect to writing centers at large?
  • How can it be applied to the MHS Writing Center?

Monday, November 3, 2014

Invisible Voice

At times it seems as though teachers prefer a lack of voice in writing; it might be because it is easier to standardized voiceless writing or because there is less grey area without voice. But what does it do to writing? Discuss your own experience with voice in academic writing, as well as exploring the implications of the article. Be sure to include quotes and detailed descriptions.

Remember to include the following in your COMPLETE PARAGRAPH RESPONSE:

  • Your impressions of the article (likes/dislikes/agree/disagree)
  • How does it connecting to writing centers at large?
  • How can it be applied to the MHS Writing Center?

Monday, October 27, 2014

Debriefing MWCA

Discuss your experience at MWCA. Focus on your performance, sessions you attended, and what information you walked away with. Be specific- your response should be a beefy paragraph.

Wednesday, October 15, 2014

"Training Tutors to Talk about Writing"

North claims the following about writing (and tutoring writing)- "As I tell my students (who accuse me of thinking in bumper stickers), we are who we are as writers-- and tutors of writing--  because of who we have been; and the conceptual and emotional baggage of 15 or 20 or 30 years of schooling won't be changed by a dozen hours in the Reserve Room of the library." Do you agree or disagree? Discuss your opinion in detail, using evidence from the text. Connect this with the article we read and explain how it applies to our center.

Remember to include the following in your COMPLETE PARAGRAPH RESPONSE:
  • Your impressions of the article (likes/dislikes/agree/disagree)
  • How does it connecting to writing centers at large?
  • How can it be applied to the MHS Writing Center?

Thursday, October 2, 2014

Dimensions of the Tutorial: How it Breaks Down

"A good tutor function[s] to awaken individuals to their potentials and to channel their creative energies toward self-enhancing ends" (Murphy 16).

In "The Tutor's Role: Developing an Informed Practice," the author discusses the different dimensions of tutoring (pretextual, textual, and posttextual). Explore the different elements of these three dimensions and discuss their significance.

Remember to include the following in your COMPLETE PARAGRAPH RESPONSE:

  • Your impressions of the article (likes/dislikes/agree/disagree)
  • How does it connecting to writing centers at large?
  • How can it be applied to the MHS Writing Center?

Tuesday, September 16, 2014

AR1: "Teach Writing as a Process, Not a Product"

In the traditional classroom, importance is often placed on the product a student creates. While some attention may be paid to the process, the bulk of the grade, the discussion, and the significance is invested in the final product. However, Donald Murray disagrees with this practice in "Teach Writing as a Process, Not a Product;" he believes the importance lies in the process of writing. Reflect on your impressions of this article and what you can take away from it. Be detailed.


Remember to include the following in your COMPLETE PARAGRAPH response:

  • Your impressions of the article (likes/dislikes/agree/disagree)
  • How does it connect to writing centers at large?
  • How can it be applied to the MHS Writing Center?

Tuesday, June 3, 2014

MGP: Billy the Kid and Your Project

Michael Ondaatje's The Collected Works of Billy the Kid is a fantastic example of what can be done with multigenre projects. His creative blend of fiction and fact craft an engaging story for readers. What elements of the excerpt did you find most engaging? How can that be transferred to your own writing? Describe elements that you would craft differently if you were writing Billy the Kid's story. Think critically about Ondaatje's piece: what does he include (whether it is genre-based or stylistic) that would add to your project? Explain each in detail. Feel free to respond to one another's comments.


Monday, May 19, 2014

The Beat Goes On: Life After Seniors

Though there are many similarities between a high school writing center and their university counterparts, there is a challenge at the end of the school year that is unique to the high school setting: our staff size is cut significantly, though we have several weeks left to operate before we close at the end of the school year. However numbers differ (this year we go from having 22 available consultants to 6), high school centers are impacted greatly by the departure of senior staff members. So how do we continue to offer services that our community has grown accustomed to? With community supports such as workshops, whole class consultations, and individual offerings all being part of our student and staff services, re-evaluating how we operate is necessary. Explore this issue and provide suggestions for how we might approach this issue while still effectively serving our school community.

Monday, April 14, 2014

Idea Check: 9th Grade Implications?

In the article "The Idea Check: Changing ESL Students' Use of the Writing Center," Enders discusses some of the realities of dealing with ESL clients and how they might better assist those writers. Discuss how his findings might have implications for our center, specifically in regards to our 9th grade students. What might we do in our situation, based on Enders's findings? Be sure to respond with a developed answer, using specifics.

Thursday, March 20, 2014

Romano Response

"A writer with no voice is no writer at all."

In Romano's Crafting Authentic Voice, we are introduced to voice and its importance in the first few chapters. Though not a new concept for our center, Romano adds a new perspective to voice and how we approach it. Voice, of course, can go beyond our formal essays and be incorporated into all areas of communication, especially if we want that communication to be engaging and illuminate our ideas. Consider Romano's view of voice: what ideas interested you? What did you agree or disagree with? Discuss any ideas that stuck out in a particular way to you. What questions might you ask Romano next week based on what you read? Be detailed.

Sunday, March 2, 2014

Here, There, Everywhere: On Location Tutoring

In Holly Bruland's piece, "Accomplishing Intellectual Work: An Investigation of the Re-Locations Enacted Through On-Location Tutoring," classroom based tutoring, and the various aspects of it, are discussed at length. Consider the impact of in-class tutoring on consultations in comparison with Bruland's account. How do they both help and hurt the consultations? Use examples from your own experience.

Be sure to craft a detailed answer and use quotes to support your response.

Wednesday, February 5, 2014

"You're Not Writing the Students' Papers For Them, Are You?": An Ethical Discussion

Steve Sherwood, in his piece "Ethics and Improvisation," discusses various ethical issues faced by writing centers, and how those issues change according to the environment or community in which a given center is based. How do we deal with the issues Sherwood discusses in his article? Discuss how ethical issues crop up in the Writing Center, how we currently deal with these ethics dilemmas, and how we might apply elements of this article into our own practices.

Be sure to craft a detailed answer and use quotes to support your response.

Wednesday, January 22, 2014

Consultant or Copy Editor: Creating Change in the Center

The Writing Center has had its experience with reluctant clients, forced clients, whole classes, and eager students. Generally, it seems our most difficult cases stem from those forced to attend the Writing Center or are reluctant to be there. So how to we reinterpret what we do to target those students? After reading "Recalibrating an established Writing center: From supplementary service to academic discipline" by Matthew Schultz, consider how his discussion may apply to our own writing center.